Updates

Attacks on public health defeated—for now.

The coal lobby and their allies are trying to block the EPA from protecting public health, but we’ve held the line against some of their worst attacks: In March 2011, the U.S. Senate rejected a bill that would have blocked standards for soot, mercury and carbon pollution. In April, the Senate defeated four more bills that would have blocked the EPA from cutting air pollution.

Report | Environment Missouri Research & Policy Center

More Wind, Less Warming

American wind power already produced enough energy in 2013 to power 15 million homes. Continued, rapid development of wind energy would allow the renewable resource to supply 30 percent of the nation’s electricity by 2030, providing more than enough carbon reductions to meet the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed Clean Power Plan.

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News Release | Environment America

Report: U.S. power plants world’s 3rd largest carbon polluters, edging out India

As world leaders prepare to gather here for the United Nations Climate Summit next week, a new study shows that U.S. power plants alone produce more carbon pollution than the entire economies of India, Russia, Japan or any other nation besides China.

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News Release | Environment America

U.S. House blocks protections for 2 million miles of streams

Washington, DC - Two million miles of rivers and streams across the country could remain vulnerable to development and pollution, under a bill that won approval today by the U.S. House of Representatives. The waters affected help provide drinking water to 117 million Americans.

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News Release | Environment Missouri

New Report: Solar Capacity in Missouri Tripled in 2013

JEFFERSON CITY – Today, Environment Missouri Research & Policy Center released a new report, Lighting the Way: The Top Ten States that Helped Drive America’s Solar Energy Boom in 2013, showing strong solar growth across the nation, including a more than triple increase in Missouri in 2013. The report emphasizes that it is not availability of sunlight that makes states solar leaders, but the degree to which state and local governments have created effective public policy to help capture the virtually unlimited and pollution-free energy from the sun.

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Report | Environment Missouri

Lighting the Way

Solar energy is on the rise. Over the course of the last decade, the amount of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity in the United States has increased more than 120-fold, from 97 megawatts in 2003 to more than 12,000 megawatts at the end of 2013. In the first quarter of 2014, solar energy accounted for 74 percent of all the new electric generation capacity installed in the United States.

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